Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Still wandering through the night

If Warren was still around, he'd surely be close to the sign-off, if not the last musical guest, for Dave.



I saw that last interview happen in 2002, and Dave's remembrance, in which he remembered the music:

“The music itself was just exciting,” Letterman said. “It was just thundering and exciting and rhythmic and complicated. … It was not the kind of rock ‘n’ roll you’d hear much of. And then the lyrics … were so vivid. Each song was like watching a motion picture. He was a poet and a storyteller and a good friend of ours.”
e: The History of Warren Zevon on David Letterman | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/warren-zevon-on-david-letterman/?trackback=tsmclip
“The music itself was just exciting,” Letterman said. “It was just thundering and exciting and rhythmic and complicated. … It was not the kind of rock ‘n’ roll you’d hear much of. And then the lyrics … were so vivid. Each song was like watching a motion picture. He was a poet and a storyteller and a good friend of ours.”

Read More: The History of Warren Zevon on David Letterman | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/warren-zevon-on-david-letterman/?trackback=tsmclip
“The music itself was just exciting,” Letterman said. “It was just thundering and exciting and rhythmic and complicated. … It was not the kind of rock ‘n’ roll you’d hear much of. And then the lyrics … were so vivid. Each song was like watching a motion picture. He was a poet and a storyteller and a good friend of ours.”

Read More: The History of Warren Zevon on David Letterman | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/warren-zevon-on-david-letterman/?trackback=tsmclip
“The music itself was just exciting,” Letterman said. “It was just thundering and exciting and rhythmic and complicated. … It was not the kind of rock ‘n’ roll you’d hear much of. And then the lyrics … were so vivid. Each song was like watching a motion picture. He was a poet and a storyteller and a good friend of ours.”

Read More: The History of Warren Zevon on David Letterman | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/warren-zevon-on-david-letterman/?trackback=tsmclip
“The music itself was just exciting,” Letterman said. “It was just thundering and exciting and rhythmic and complicated. … It was not the kind of rock ‘n’ roll you’d hear much of. And then the lyrics … were so vivid. Each song was like watching a motion picture. He was a poet and a storyteller and a good friend of ours.”

Read More: The History of Warren Zevon on David Letterman | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/warren-zevon-on-david-letterman/?trackback=tsmclip
“The music itself was just exciting,” Letterman said. “It was just thundering and exciting and rhythmic and complicated. … It was not the kind of rock ‘n’ roll you’d hear much of. And then the lyrics … were so vivid. Each song was like watching a motion picture. He was a poet and a storyteller and a good friend of ours.”

Read More: The History of Warren Zevon on David Letterman | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/warren-zevon-on-david-letterman/?trackback=tsmclip
“The music itself was just exciting,” Letterman said. “It was just thundering and exciting and rhythmic and complicated. … It was not the kind of rock ‘n’ roll you’d hear much of. And then the lyrics … were so vivid. Each song was like watching a motion picture. He was a poet and a storyteller and a good friend of ours.”

Read More: The History of Warren Zevon on David Letterman | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/warren-zevon-on-david-letterman/?trackback=tsmclip

Monday, May 11, 2015

Your eyes won't believe what your mind can't conceive

I like B-music. What's B-music? You know what B-movies are. B-music's the also-ran, the didn't-quite-make-it, the one-hit-wonder or, in its most piquant form, never-was-gonna-make-it-but-they-followed-the-dream-anyway (aka Anvil).

I fell down a Spotify k-hole and found some sweet late-disco/early Quiet Storm B-music.

The Jones Girls had been plying their trade for most of the 70s. They were Detroit-born sisters, forged in gospel singing, discovered first by Curtis Mayfield and later, after backing Diana Ross on tour, re-discovered by Gamble and Huff. Stars aligned then, and though they didn't become stars, dancefloors pulsed in '81 with this track.



I'm aching to find a good 12- or 7-inch copy of it, and in this week's obsession with it I've figured out its A-list sonic cousin.



Chaka's track is clearly more sophisticated, and there's a good reason why there's a gulf way wider than the Mediterranean Sea that separates "Tunisia" from "Egypt." Chaka's single "Night" in Tunisia is a cover that came from the mind of an actual genius who's genetically incapable of creating something as rustic as the unnecessary Middle Eastern-sounding keyboard riff in "Nights Over Egypt."

The Jones Girls can sing. But what they didn't have is access. The saying in the creative world is that you have to work with artists who are at least a little better than you so that your craft is raised. Access is based on timing, and the Girls' timing was not good, seeing as it was situated on the back-end of the (post-payola) Gamble and Huff juggernaut and given writers from the Philadelphia International stable that were maybe on the downslope of creating hit soul music.

After 1984, while Chaka found the third act of her career, The Jones Girls never got back on track.

Unequal songs, unequal careers, unequal access. But I (and probably only I) respond both songs with equal enjoyment, despite the unfair outcomes for the singers. But maybe they didn't want any more than that -- someone's ears being pleased at the sound of their song.

I best return my ears to simply listening before I embark on a master's-thesis rumination about the post-80s diminishing returns of Patrice Rushen.

Monday, March 23, 2015

Random Play: Crushed my groove again

Now, it's distance and time that allows me to approach this track as an audiophile might. When it was contemporary, though, it was among a number of music videos I'd impatiently wait through in order to gawk at "The Reflex" one more time.

I could've sworn on a stack of shiny vintage car keys that this track as produced by same dude that produced ZZ Top--and not solely because it's firmly set in the world of fast vehicles and has a mid-Eighties video with a cast of a thousand extras.


Sammy Hagar - I Can't Drive 55 by jpdc11

No, I'm wrong, though Ted Templeman, unsurprisingly, did helm Van Halen records, and, very surprisingly, earlier recordings that are both ecstatic and smooth.

Which means the same dude that brought you "Hot For Teacher" also made "Tupelo Honey" happen.

I love the spectrum.

I didn't, however, love my dinner at the Red Rocker's restaurant in Cabo. He should stick to music.

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

I'm not a fugitive on the run

This PE track played on the 'pod as I ran three blocks in a minute to make it to join a phone meeting at work.

The irony was palpable with each step. At least it was ironic to me as I struggled to reach the cell that's not of my choosing to be on time for a meeting (a meeting! Already it's hopeless.) that I didn't want to attend nor that I truly care about.

It's not really a raw deal, but, man, what are we doing when we're not running toward something we chose without restriction or requirement?

Public Enemy - Black Steel In The Hour Of Chaos (1988) from Golden Era Videos on Vimeo.

Saturday, February 28, 2015

You wrote the note.



This track serenaded me during wheels-down in a gray, rainy France in June all those years ago--not to visit, to live. As we coasted on the tarmac at CDG, that guitar riff barked out of foam-covered headphones and a worn TDK in my player, and the cascade of drums urged me from apprehension to exhilaration. I was gonna do it.

What, I didn't know. But I was. I had to. I was already there.

And, funny, I thought I didn't have this--and I had wanted it--but it is already here.


Thursday, February 26, 2015

I choose me.




I know, you never intended to be in this world.
But you're in it all the same.
-Mary Oliver